Commercial

Some Oil and Gas Firms Won’t be Flying Super Pumas Anytime Soon, BBC Says

By S.L. Fuller | July 11, 2017

A PHI Sikorsky S-92A cruises over an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin

A PHI Sikorsky S-92A cruises over an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin

Although the U.K. and Norway are ready to lift the ban on the Airbus Helicopters H225LP and AS332L2, some firms are hesitating. Both BP and Total E&P UK said they do have immediate plans to fly the Super Pumas, BBC reported.

According to both BBC and the offshore union Unite, BP plans to wait until the investigation into the 2016 crash has been completed. A new preliminary report from Accident Investigation Board Norway (AIBN) sad its investigation points to a fatigue fracture in the main rotor gearbox as the cause of the fatal CHC Helicopter EC225LP. However, it was unknown, at that point, what caused the fracture.

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“A survey of 2500 offshore workers found nine out of 10 were against their return and 65% said they would refuse to fly in one,” said Unite of the Super Puma.

Airbus released a survey, asking for feedback concerning offshore helicopters in general and the H225 specifically. It polls participants about their thoughts on the new safety improvements made to the H225, as well as general helicopter preferences.

Total E&P UK said it does not have immediate need to fly the Super Puma, BBC reported. The Sikorsky S-92 “fulfilled its operational requirements,” according to the news outlet.

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