Military

US Army Announces Deployment of 101st Airborne Division

By S.L. Fuller | January 10, 2018

Pilots from 159th CAB, 101st Airborne Division, land an Apache helicopter at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, as the sun sets behind the mountains. (Photo by Chief Warrant Officer 2 George Chino)

Pilots from 159th CAB, 101st Airborne Division, land an Apache helicopter at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, as the sun sets behind the mountains. Photo by Chief Warrant Officer 2 George Chino

The 101st Airborne Division is deploying to Afghanistan. The U.S. Department of the Army said Wednesday that the division headquarters stationed at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, would deploy in the U.S. later this year.

"The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) remains, as it did 75 years ago when it was forged during the maelstrom of World War II, ready to answer the call to fight and win our nation's wars," said Maj. Gen. Andrew P. Poppas, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) commander. "This will be the division headquarters' fourth deployment to Afghanistan in the last decade. We know the terrain, we know our partners and we know our mission."

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According to the Army, the Screaming Eagles would replace 3rd Infantry Division Headquarters as part of a regular rotation of forces to support Operation Freedom's Sentinel.

The 101st celebrated its 75th anniversary last year. Retired brigade commander Col. Jimmy Blackmon and Greg “Turbo” Turberville, retired chief warrant officer 5 (CW5) and aviator, described to R&WI in November the changes the division had made during their tenures. One of the most notable changes was that the 101st went from implementing big formations and air assaults to using small teams.

Some things, though, did not change.

“What did not change in my mind is each time I went back, you put that 101st patch on your shoulder and you hold yourself different in public. You thought of yourself different. Maybe not consciously,” Turberville said. “But your confidence was different. So that didn't change for me. In fact it's one of the things that drove me back, the magnetism, to the 101st, was perhaps that. I wanted to feel that within my psyche again — be part of that team.”

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