Military

US Military Resumes Osprey Flights Following Crash, Safety Review

By S.L. Fuller | December 20, 2016
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28823An MV-22B Osprey takes flight to transport Marines to conduct a tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel training mission during the Amphibious Squadron 5 and 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit Integration exercise aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) July 16, 2016. PMINT is a 2-week training evolution between the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group and 11th MEU, allowing Marines and sailors to combine and employ their forces together for their first at-sea period in preparation for their Western Pacific 16-2 deployment. The Marines are with Alpha Co., Battalion Landing Team 1st Bn., 4th Marines; the Osprey and its crew are with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 163; both are currently assigned to the 11th MEU. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Zachery C. Laning/Released)003801_3f59e3086e_o

An MV-22B Osprey takes flight to transport Marines to conduct a tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel training mission. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Marine Corps

After what the U.S. military referred to as a “thorough, careful and exhaustive review of MV-22 aviation safety procedures,” U.S. Forces, Japan said that grounding of the Bell Boeing Osprey in Okinawa’s 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force has been lifted. The official announcement came just three days after the Dec. 13 nonfatal crash.

On Dec. 15, the U.S. Defense Dept. awarded approximately $411.9 million for the tiltrotor’s maintenance in two separate Navy contracts.

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According to the news release, the crash is still undergoing investigation. However, the military said it believes confidently that the rotor blades colliding with the refueling line was the cause of the crash.

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