Military

Raytheon Awarded $60 Million For CH-53, V-22 FLIR Systems

By Walt Evans | August 31, 2018
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MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Lance Cpl. Kieran Hayes a landing support specialist with Combat Logistics Battalion 15, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit waits for a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter to get in position to conduct helicopter support team mission during PHIBRON-MEU integration training at Camp Pendleton, April 13, 2017. The CH-53E Super Stallion makes the MEU that much more capable as it is able to move personnel, equipment, and vehicles from ship to shore, demonstrating the 15th MEU's ship-to-shore connector capabilities. PMINT lays the foundation for all the elements of the MEU to develop relationships with their Navy counterparts and gain an understanding of the teamwork required to accomplish the mission. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Frank Cordoba)

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Lance Cpl. Kieran Hayes a landing support specialist with Combat Logistics Battalion 15, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit waits for a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter to get in position to conduct helicopter support team mission during PHIBRON-MEU integration training at Camp Pendleton, April 13, 2017.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Frank Cordoba)

Raytheon [RTN] took home a five-year $59.7 million contract by the U.S. Navy for support of its forward looking infrared (FLIR) system aboard the CH-53 and V-22 Osprey aircraft, the Department of Defense announced on Wednesday.

A $16 million initial delivery order for the contract’s first year was issued “concurrently with the award,” the DoD said in a press release. The U.S. Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Weapon Systems Support pulled the $16 million from 2018 Navy working capital funds.

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Raytheon’s FLIR thermal-imaging technology allows aircraft pilots to see through low-visibility conditions like rain, smoke, fog, and darkness. The technology was originally developed by Raytheon subsidiary Texas Instruments in 1963, and older generations of FLIR have been used by the military for decades.

Third-gen FLIR is a significant upgrade for pilots, adding the ability to toggle between wide, medium, narrow, and ultra-narrow fields of view, among other improvements. A majority of work for the contract will be performed at Raytheon’s facilities in McKinney, Texas, and El Segundo, California.

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